The Neuroscience of Loneliness

Many people around the world experiencing loneliness and some already claim that they feel even more lonely now than ever before. It’s clear that all humans need handshakes, hugs, perhaps pet from another human shoulder. Feeling this lonely also increases social media online interactions, Zoom video conferences to ease out some level of loneliness.

The Neuroscience of Loneliness
The Neuroscience of Loneliness
The Neuroscience of Loneliness

Social isolation created uncertainty and panic all over the world. Suddenly with a lack of social interactions, people feel ‘extra lonely’. New Science research revealed that Neuroscience of loneliness that isolation has an impact on human physical and mental health.

Many people around the world experiencing loneliness and some already claim that they feel even more lonely now than ever before. It’s clear that all humans need handshakes, hugs, perhaps pet from another human shoulder. Feeling this lonely also increases social media,  online interactions, Zoom video conferences to ease out some level of loneliness.

 

Scientific Research 

According to scientific Brain scanning studies revealed that significant value to your brain by interacting socially. This study shows that the subcortical brain region such as the ventral striatum which plays a major role in human motivation activated when socially interact with others.

 

Subcortical brain region such as the ventral striatum which plays a major role in human motivation

 

On the other side loneliness activated brain regions associated with distress, rejection, and de-motivation. Study hypothesis human interaction programmed in our brains for long-term human survival and uncovers that lonely people tend to focus on negative and scrutinize people’s intentions. This can further drive the vicious loneliness cycle to feel even more loneliness.

In general, every personality does not seek the same level of social interactions. For example, extrovert people are more socially interactive than introverted personalities. His research provides details that having access to large social networks results in lesser loneliness compare with peer-groups.

It’s important keeping your Interactive communication with a friend, colleagues, your family members in the current crisis situation to ease out the loneliness. Science shows that loneliness also has significant negative impacts on individual and group physical and mental well-being.

 

Reference:

1. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/ventral-striatum

2. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/brain-chemistry/201712/the-neuroscience-loneliness

3. https://www.labroots.com/trending/neuroscience/12027/loneliness-affect-brain

4. https://www.apa.org/action/resources/research-in-action/scan